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Shipping is a terrible thing to do to vegetables. They probably get jet-lagged, just like people. — Elizabeth Berry

Books

The Locavore Way

The Locavore Way

The Locavore Way
Discover and Enjoy the Pleasures of Locally Grown Food

It’s out now!
Here’s a calendar of classes, signings and other events!

Join us. Millions of Americans are rediscovering the pleasures of locally grown food. By eating food grown close to home, you can boost their health, nurture an open landscape, support a robust local economy and enhance a sense of community . . . all while savoring scrumptious, satisfying meals.

It’s no wonder that the number of farmers’ markets has more than doubled in the last 15 years. And, the number of people getting produce straight from the farm has increased almost twentyfold in the same period!

Enter The Locavore Way by Amy Cotler. For novices and veterans alike, this friendly guide to eating locally gives readers everything they need to buy, cook, and eat food grown, raised and produced close to home.

Cotler covers it all — Why eat locally, where to find local foods, how to eat locally on a budget, what questions to ask at the farmers’ market, and even how to grow your own food. She offers savvy shopping tips, simple guides to preparing whatever is in season, ideas for bringing out the best flavors in farm-fresh foods, and strategies to make the harvest last.  All this is toped off with a guide to building a better food system through local food advocacy, as well as a local food and sustainability glossary to unscramble terminology.
Cotler demystifies local foods and demonstrates how eating within one’s own “foodshed” is as simple as it is satisfying. The Locavore Way is at once a practical, how-to guide and a celebration of all that is fresh and flavorful. With this handy resource tucked into their canvas market tote, readers will have the information they need to find, select, store, prepare, and preserve the bounty . . . all year long!

The Locavore Way is the people’s solution to The Omnivore’s Dilemma, an empowering hands-on guide to seeking out and savoring local seasonal foods.

Knowledgeable and unpretentious, Amy Cotler is a wonderful guide to a better way of eating for people looking for culinary treasures in their own backyard.
-Barbara Wheaton, author, Savoring the Past, culinary historian

As a veteran teacher, cookbook author and dedicated farm to table advocate, Amy Cotler deeply understands the importance of local food. Her work with Berkshire Grown has served as a national model for all those interested in strengthening local communities through a direct farm to table economy.
-Peter Hoffman, Savoy and Back Forty Restaurants, New York, board member, Chefs Collaborative

Amy Cotler is a first class and innovative communicator, a culinary professional and farm to food advocate who puts the pleasure into eating locally with her work connecting the local farmers and their food with everyone.
-Hilary Baum, founder, The Baum Forum (on food and agriculture issues)

To order:

Your local independent bookseller

http://www.indiebound.org/indie-bookstore-finder

Buy on Amazon

Farm to School Cookbook Cover

Farm to School Cookbook Cover

Fresh from the Farm: The Massachusetts Farm to School Cookbook

What?

This book is a guide to buying and preparing farm fresh foods for school kitchens, which includes USDA approved school-tested recipes and a supplement for educators. Its aim is support the purchase of more locally grown produce by schools. The result? More nutritious lunches and an economic boost for local agriculture.

Who?

Although mainly a much needed tool for school kitchens, the book is also useful for parent groups, school boards, wellness committees and non-profits interested in improving school nutrition through a farm to school program. Farmers find it helpful when selling their produce to schools, because they often don’t have much experience preparing fresh produce. Educators find the section —Copy This! For Educators and Their Classrooms — useful for integrating sustainable food concepts into their classrooms and bridging the gap between the classroom and the kitchen.

Why?

  • To give school kitchens the skills they need to seek out and prepare local produce. School kitchens do not get support from the current food school system to do so.
  • To encourage kids to eat their vegetables, a huge part of a healthy diet. Freshly harvested local produce is tastier, more inviting and nutritious.

Consumption of fresh vegetables pushes back against the epidemic of poor childhood nutrition and its resulting diseases.

  • To help educators integrate a passion for good food and an understanding of sustainable food issues into the classroom.
  • To boost local farms that invigorate local economies, support biodiversity and an open working landscape. Buying from local farms develops real relationships between those who produce and consume food, helping to build a more equitable and humane regional food system.

Complete book on-line
http://www.mass.gov/agr/markets/Farm_to_school/index.htm

Review quotes

Fresh from the Farm: The Massachusetts Farm to School Cookbook is a great practical resource to incorporate seasonal, local nutritious foods into the cafeteria menu. Amy Cotler’s recipes make you want to get back in the lunch line!” -Anupama Joshi, Co-Director National Farm to School Network

Cotler has been effectively encouraging others to think more deeply about food issues for years; her enthusiasm, integrity and culinary creativity have lead many of us to “eat the view” with both intentionality and gusto!
-Kelly Erwin, Massachusetts Farm to School Project

Ms. Cotler has demonstrated her passion and commitment to the Commonwealth’s agricultural interests and, importantly, the connection of those interests with consumers of all ages. Her literary work has proven to be an invaluable tool to further cement the role of local agricultural production as a critical component of a healthy food system for Massachusetts.
-Scott J. Soares, Commissioner, Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources